Reviews

Seven Deadly Sins: A Review

The cover of my well-loved copy of Corey Taylor’s Seven Deadly Sins.

What can I say?  I’ve never been one to follow the norm.  I  became a fan of Corey Taylor, the author before I became a fan of Corey Taylor, the musician.

On a whim, I purchased Seven Deadly Sins Taylor’s first book.  I didn’t really know what to expect.  Little did I know that a book with CMFT (Corey Mother Fuckin’ Taylor) dressed as an inebriated devil would become one of my favorite works.

Is CMFT going to be considered one of the most profound writers in the English language?  Probably not.  But will his words entertain you AND make you think?  Yes.

Seven Deadly Sins is Taylor’s personal examination of the archaic Biblical sins.  Taylor addresses each sin, in-depth.  He uses his own experiences and philosophy in an attempt to determine if these antiquated notions are still relevant in today’s society.  As he delves deeper into each of these anachronistic sins, he begins to negate their necessity in the 21st century.

On top of this complex examination of sins, Taylor also introduces his reader to a wide variety of what I lovingly call “Corey Taylor Swears.” Among my favorites are “knock the twinkle off your twilight” (37) and “holy hamster shit” (58).

My copy of Seven Deadly Sins is well-annotated.

Within the myriad of new phrases, Taylor presents some very deep and thought-provoking statements.  “People have developed into beings that would give anything to be free.  We have seen it in revolution after revolution:  men and women banding together to shuffle off an immoral coil disguised as a government that does nothing but everything of, for, and by themselves.  The crooked claw their way into the hearts of leadership to dismantle and control the very tools we are given to live our lives…This is the spirit of the great minds who have tried to pull us together for something we never even knew we needed” (144). My only reaction after reading this paragraph was wow.

My copy of Seven Deadly Sins shows the markings of a well-loved book.  Broken spine, pages falling out, creased covers, and copious marginal notes.

 

Bottom Line:  Still waters run deep.

 

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